News for the ‘Fashion’ Category

New in Denim: Ashley Williams x Selfridges

Newbie designer and all-round brills person Ashley Williams has collaborated with Selfridges. The launch of this fun link-up, planned around the Denim Studio’s 1st anniversary, is taking place tonight and I’ll be there to see it up close.

This range is a clever way of a retailer and a designer working together to test the waters – here’s why.

The capsule comprises eight Autumn/Winter 2014 designs, but each given a denim spin. So there’s the amazing leather horse jacket and dress, re-imagined in denim, an exclusive motif of western style dancers on a sweatshirt and a pair of jeans and the cat print on a white tee that’s perfect for pairing with true blues. Easier & cheaper to buy into than leather, no?

Instead of buying Ashley’s mainline collection, Selfridges have been clever in setting themselves apart from their competitors and dipping their toe into the Ashley pool at the same time. They have been able to work with an emerging designer on their terms, collaborating on the product itself – utilising the designer’s nous and the retailer’s rep as a denim destination. With a prestigious launch event and the press-worthy story backing the partnership up, Selfridges is able to see how the goods perform in store and test Ashley product on their customer to see if she’s a worthwhile investment for future seasons (if you ask me – duh.)

I’d like to see more of this in the future. Sure, I’ve heard plenty of stores asking for an exclusive on a style or a colour way to give them the edge over other retailers, but why not ask for specific tweaks, or plan product with the designer personally to utilise the retailer’s large-scale production knowledge/expert contacts and the designer’s idiosyncratic vision? After all, if there’s one thing that designers could use a leg up with it’s getting their garments made by the right factories to achieve the right price, and then ultimately achieve the right sell-through. It’s all good for everyone.

Read more and see the pics on Dazed Digital & i-D.

Posted: August 14th, 2014
Categories: Fashion
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Commercialising Creativity

A number of months ago I took part in an informal interview with an MBA student from London Business School who was writing a report commissioned by the British Fashion Council about the state of the industry and designer practice. Little did I know then that my involvement, sitting on a bench in the sun outside the Truman Brewery, would mean a credit in the acknowledgements of the report alongside the likes of Sian Westerman of Rothschild, Marigay McKee from Saks Fifth Avenue and Andrea O’Donnell from Lane Crawford.

And as for the report itself? Titled ‘Commercialising Creativity‘, the findings make for a compelling read. I’m sure many of the industry’s stalwarts will think these obvious and unnecessary to repeat, but for designers, especially those in the early stages of their businesses, the report will be invaluable not only as advice for best practice, but as a guideline to follow to keep them on the straight and narrow towards commercial success.

With that in mind, now feels like an apt time to quietly announce the arrival of my new project, The Bridge Club. Too often I have seen designers with inimitable potential yet little to no business acumen or infrastructure. I’d like to change that. I’ll be working with a select number of exciting London designer brands offering a 360 degree view and tailored strategies to help them grow, form meaningful partnerships and become self-sustaining. Watch this space for its official launch post-LFW and keep an eye on Twitter/Instagram @TheBridgeClub_

Phoebe at Vogue

For the first time ever I attended the Vogue festival this year, mainly to see it for myself but also because Phoebe Philo was speaking. I attended the talk, Phoebe in conversation with Alexandra Shulman, and below are my favourite notes from the hour. (N.B. As I was furiously scribbling a lot of these are in note-form/paraphrased.)

P: Céline didn’t have a historical designer. It was liberating, I could do what I wanted to do. What it did stand for was quality. I never looked at the archives.

A: Did you talk to a lot of people, friends, about what was missing in fashion? Because Céline has added to the offering out there.
P: I didn’t look around, it came from within. It’s what I really believe. I don’t put it out there unless I stand behind it.

A: Can you define the things you believe in? It seems you really feel pained by compromise?
P: I find mediocrity hard. I am a passionate person. I believe I give it a lot, so if it’s not good what’s the point?

Talking about the new Céline flagship store on Mount Street:
P: I think [the stores] should stand for something. I just wanted it to be strong. There are lots of shops around that are quite bland. I wanted to do something different and new. I worked with FOS, an artist on the interior. A completely absurd, wonderful guy. Very into function. He knew nothing about luxury goods.

A: What attracted you to fashion?
P: It was a bit of a calling. I feel somehow it was always in me. Using clothes to say something. When I was little I was very clear about what I wanted to wear. My mother dressed me in good, tasteful clothes and I wanted to wear things that were a bit sparkly, spangly and trashy.

A: How do you feel about being copied?
P: Mostly it’s flattering and exciting. Coco Chanel said ‘so long as you’re copied you’re relevant.’ Occasionally it’s too close to the bone but the details, the fabrics, the craftsmanship is hard to copy.

A: How much do you feel you personally have to exemplify the brand?
P: I don’t really think about it. I don’t find it useful to me getting on with what I do to think about it. I just do what I do.

A: You’ve said you dislike the cult of the designer. You’re always in strong control of your image.
P: I’ve just done what I was comfortable doing. I have an innate fear of fame. It doesn’t look like a good place to be. I like being incognito, I value that freedom.

A: Women aren’t usually at the top, running businesses. Do you think it would be different if they did?
P: I don’t think gender is relevant. I see men struggling as much as women within fashion. I think it’s more to do with individuals, personality. It’s a high pressure job. The bigger question is why aren’t there more women generally running companies? It should change. It is changing.
A: Would it make working practices different if women were running them?
P: Not particularly, I don’t see it like that. We should spend more time just getting on with it, not talking about the difference. But – somehow, somewhere girls are getting the message that they’re not good enough. I think clothes can make a political statement. When you wear Céline you should feel confident and strong. We should be teaching young girls to feel good. I don’t think young boys necessarily feel good either, maybe it’s our culture.. But there are so many more men in powerful positions. I think it’s motherhood. There’s a breaking point where people have left to bring up children and when they come back they miss the stage at which they would have gone right up. For the average person I think it’s very complicated. I’m very privileged and fortunate. It’s tough.

On the fashion industry’s unrealistic perspective on women’s bodies.
P: It’s complex. It’s good to talk about it. It’s unrealistic to think the fashion/film/sex industries won’t have an extreme ideal of beauty as a way of selling themselves. Let’s talk about it though. I don’t have the answers. I really do believe anybody can be seductive and sexy and gorgeous and beautiful. We use an extreme idea of beauty as a way of showing Céline but I don’t believe it should be like that outside of the show.

A: The role of the show? The point?
P: It’s a concentrated way of getting the message across. They last 8 minutes. Our moment. Everyone stops talking, they listen and watch. Been very happy showing in that format but Rick Owens’ show [with the dancers] got me thinking I’ve got to think about another format sometime.
A: But there’s still that moment.
P: It’s that created environment. Every detail of that is yours. Some sense of live performance. I’m moved by it. It takes effort.

Question from the audience: How did you decide what to wear to collect your MBE?
P: I just did it. I went with my family. They were all very proud of me, it was a wonderful moment. I just did it. I just got dressed that morning.

Question from the audience: What element of clothes do you think are emancipating for women?
P: Women should have choices. I’m not a fan of women being sexualised through clothes. As long as she’s chosen to wear it, it’s different. You should dress for yourself. Don’t dress for other people. There are too many images of women that are sexualised. It’s disempowering. I would prefer if we didn’t behave like that.

Question from the audience: Why haven’t you got your own company? The ‘Phoebe Philo’ brand?
P: It hasn’t happened so far. Maybe it will. I feel very fortunate so far.

Question from the audience: Any ambitions you would still like to fulfil?
P: I would like to create a foundation while at Céline helping people on some level. I’d like to spend some time working with less fortunate people than myself.

Question from the audience: Why don’t you sell Céline online?
P: I strongly believe you should experience Céline clothes, ultimately in the Céline store. Get a sense of the store, the materials, the world the clothes are set in. Or you go to a department store. But there you can still touch them, feel them, see how they’re constructed, look at the lining.. I feel that that process of buying clothes is important.

Posted: April 3rd, 2014
Categories: Event, Fashion
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LC:M

Congrats to all the amazing menswear designers I’ve had the privilege of working with

What to pack for Goa

While Goa sounds glamorous for Christmas, the combination of heat, suncream, sweat and dust has me worrying about my wardrobe. So the likelihood is I’ll pick up some cheap pieces to see me through the two-week break. The best thing about shopping for summer weather in the British winter is that a) there’s not much on offer, so there’s no getting overwhelmed and b) a lot of items that are suitable are likely to be reduced.

While it’s going to be 30 degrees, because I’m so pale (practically reflectively white on a beach..) I’d rather ensure I’ve got layers if I’m feeling uncomfortable. This Celia Birtwell for Uniqlo long-sleeved cotton top, £7.90 is fun and colourful way of covering up.

Ditto for legs – these Uniqlo draped trousers £9.90 are light and comfortable, and perfect for pairing with a vest top.

This Uniqlo grey flowy dress £9.90 is perfect for the flight as much as throwing over a bikini to go down to the beach and will look great with bright accessories bought from local markets.

As for beauty products – Elizabeth Arden 8 Hour Cream is a cult and this special Sun Defense for Face cream in SPF 50, £25 will ensure that I don’t go wrinkly before my time.

I can’t resist this smell; I’ve put this luxurious REN exfoliating body polish, £32 on my birthday wishlist. It’d be perfect for scrubbing away dead skin cells and maximising my tan.

For hand luggage/the beach this vivid turquoise Folli Follie bag, €105 in the sale, is a good size with lots of individual pockets, and it’ll be sure to add zing to my outfits when I get back to the British winter.

and if money were no object, I’d be shuffling around in these badboys by Marni..

Posted: November 18th, 2013
Categories: Fashion, Travel
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LFW – fantasy looks

Sibling

Roksanda Ilincic

Jonathan Saunders

Simone Rocha

Meadham Kirchhoff

Marques’Almeida

Antonio Berardi

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

Michael van der Ham

Whistles

Burberry Prorsum

Topshop Unique

Christopher Kane


Pringle of Scotland

Richard Nicoll

Peter Pilotto

Ryan Lo – Fashion East

Claire Barrow – Fashion East

Ashley Williams – Fashion East

Tom Ford

Giles

House of Holland

James Long

Marios Schwab

John Rocha

NYFW – fantasy looks

My favourite looks from the NY shows aka my fantasy wardrobe…

Band of Outsiders

 3.1 Phillip Lim

Altuzarra

Calvin Klein

MM6 Maison Martin Margiela

DKNY

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Y-3

Derek Lam

Maki Oh

Dion Lee

Opening Ceremony

Alexander Wang

Thakoon

Theysken’s Theory

Helmut Lang

 Proenza Schouler

Prabal Gurung

Jason Wu

Givenchy Menswear

It’s so barmy knowing someone who worked on this.

J’adore the stripes…., and then the refreshing burst of white

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Posted: June 29th, 2013
Categories: Fashion
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Broken brogues

It looks like my trusty Russell & Bromley brogues are no more.

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There you can see my neon green American Apparel sock poking out the side, where the sole and the upper have detached from one another. The cracks and scuffs have only added character to my black cherry-hued lace-ups if you ask me, but I think this might be taking it a step too far.

Posted: June 7th, 2013
Categories: Fashion
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Williamsburg Denim

I recently discovered Williamsburg Denim (est 2010), a brand from across the pond and a small operation doing good. It’s an American brand through and through, playing up to its location. All the styles are named after streets in Williamsburg, imbuing the label with a serious local vibe, and at the same time appealing to an international market drawn to Williamsburg’s ‘cool’. Win win.

I can’t better this, so from the horse’s mouth:

As a 1-man company with about $3,500, the brand launched with only 3 jeans, all imported.  Inspired by President Obama’s call to bring more business back to the USA, the brand now has evolved to include jeans MADE IN USA that compete with the world’s top denim brands at nearly half the price.  It’s only fitting that the first of the American Made jeans be named “HOPE STREET.

I love the washes – from this rugged murky denim to the incredibly light denim ‘sky blue’ (they even do coral, pink and lilac if you’re blessed with a small enough frame to pull that kind of thing off!). As a curvy lady I was very excited to fit into a smaller size of skinny jean than I was expecting, and to find that there was no gape at the small of the back as there is with so many high street jeans. Plus, my skinnies have a wicked orange inner seam and I love the ‘W’ buttons and robust feel of the denim (the complete antithesis of my high street skinnies that feel like a notch up from leggings!) They’re onto something if you ask me.

 

Available at OPENING CEREMONY35 King Street Covent Garden and KJ’S LAUNDRY74 Marylebone Ln